Instrumentation for Heavy Metals Analysis in Cannabis

Author: Chris English

Restek Corporation

Published By: Cannabis Industry Journal

Year of Publication: 2017

Link: https://www.cannabisindustryjournal.com/column/instrumentation-for-heavy-metals-analysis-in-cannabis/

Abstract:

Heavy metals are common environmental contaminants often resulting from mining operations, industrial waste, automotive emissions, coal fired power plants, amount other sources. Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (Flame AA) and Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (GFAA) are both techniques that determine both the identity and quantity of specific elements.

Instrumentation Used for Terpene Analysis

Author: Tim Herring

Restek Corporation

Published By: Cannabis Industry Journal

Year of Publication: 2017

Link: https://www.cannabisindustryjournal.com/column/instrumentation-used-for-terpene-analysis/

Abstract:

Because terpenes are somewhat volatile, the Restek team recommends using gas chromatography and advises against using HPLC for terpene analysis.

Many customers ask technical service which instrumentation is best, GC or HPLC, for analysis of terpenes. Terpenes are most amenable to GC, due to their inherent volatility. HPLC is generally not recommended; since terpenes have very low UV or MS sensitivity; the cannabinoids (which are present in percent levels) will often interfere or coelute with many of the terpenes.

New Advice on an Old Topic: Buffers in Reversed-Phase HPLC

Author: Sharon Lupo and Ty Kahler

Published By: LCGC

Year of Publication: 2017

Link: http://www.chromatographyonline.com/new-advice-old-topic-buffers-reversed-phase-hplc

Abstract:

Buffers are commonly used in reversed-phase liquid chromatography (LC) to control the ionization state of analytes. However, the addition of buffers is much more complex than simple pH control. Complex equilibria exist between these mobile-phase additives, the analytes, the silica surface, and even the stationary phase in certain circumstances. The addition of mass spectrometry (MS) as a primary detection technique makes decisions about mobile-phase additives even more crucial. In this column installment, we use a model set of analytes and selected applications to demonstrate the effects that buffers can have not only on the selectivity of a separation, but also on the sensitivity of a reversed-phase analysis when using MS detection.