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ASMS 2019

67th ASMS Conference on Mass Spectrometry and Allied Topics

Restek at ASMS 2019
Restek at ASMS 2019

RESTEK TECHNICAL POSTERS

MONDAY, JUNE 3
10:30–11:30 a.m.; 12:30–2:30 p.m.
MP 159 - Performance Trade-Offs to Consider When Implementing the High Efficiency, Small Form Factor Ions Sources
Christopher M Rattray1, Julie Kowalski2
1. Restek Corporation, 2. Trace Analytics
For more information, email Chris Rattray.
Download a PDF of the full presentation.
Read abstract

Agilent and Thermo Fisher Scientific have both released high-efficiency electron ionization (EI) sources with small ion volumes. A head-to-head comparison of the Agilent extractor and high efficiency source (HES) showed some negative chromatographic effects, such as source tailing and reduced resolution of critical isobaric separations, when analyzing low volatility PAHs with the HES. A similar experiment saw increased source tailing of low volatility pesticides when analyzed on a TSQ-8000 as compared to an Agilent 5975C with an inert source installed.

TUESDAY, JUNE 4
10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.; 1:30–2:30 p.m.
TP 082 - Rapid Profiling and Quantification of 17 Bile Acids in Human Plasma by LC-MS/MS
Dan Li, Frances Carroll, Shun-Hsin Liang, Ravali Alagandula, Justin Steimling, Sue Steinike, Paul Connolly
Restek Corporation
For more information, email Dan Li.
Download a PDF of the full presentation.
Read abstract

Bile acids are a group of major catabolic products of cholesterol. They are important biomarkers for signaling potentially harmful side effects of new drugs. There are two main types of bile acids based upon their functional groups. They are free (or unconjugated) bile acids and conjugated bile acids (primarily glycine- or taurine-bound). Quantitation of bile acids in matrix can be very challenging due to a number of factors. These include structural similarities, varying polarity and stereochemistry, the presence of isomers, limited fragmentation of unconjugated bile acids in a mass spectrometer, high endogenous levels, and matrix effects caused by phospholipids or triglycerides.

10:30–11:30 a.m.; 12:30–2:30 p.m.
WP 171 - The Analysis of Mycotoxins in CBD Oils by LC-MS/MS
Justin Steimling, Megan Pollock, Ty Kahler, Colton Myers, Ashlee Reese, Susan Steinike
Restek Corporation
For more information, email Justin Steimling.
Download a PDF of the full presentation.
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Mycotoxins, secondary metabolites produced by fungi, are among the most toxic contaminants in cannabis and other agricultural products and can cause disease and death in humans and other animals. In the analysis of mycotoxins, using immunoaffinity columns (IACs) to reduce matrix effects and eliminate potential sources of interference for LC-MS/MS analysis is common. When not used, significant matrix interferences have been shown to elute near target mycotoxins, resulting in an adverse effect on measured ion ratios. Herein, alternative approaches to IACs including dilute-and-shoot, dispersive solid phase extraction (dSPE), and pass-through SPE are evaluated and applied to the analysis of aflatoxin B1, aflatoxin B2, aflatoxin G1, aflatoxin G2, and ochratoxin A in commercially available CBD oils by LC-MS/MS.

10:30–11:30 a.m.; 12:30–2:30 p.m.
WP 521 - Phospholipid Removal from Protein Precipitated Plasma Using In-Line Sample Preparation (ILSP)
Sharon Lupo, Randy Romesberg, Xiaoning Lu
Restek Corporation
For more information, email Sharon Lupo.
Download a PDF of the full presentation.
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Phospholipids are major constituents of plasma membranes. They have been shown to cause severe ion suppression or enhancement in the analysis of biological samples by liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS). Additionally, phospholipids tend to accumulate on reversed-phase columns, causing a decrease in column performance and reduced lifetime. Offline sample preparation methods have been reported for the removal of phospholipids from protein precipitated samples. However, offline phospholipid removal methods can introduce error and add cost. In this study we have developed an innovative inline sample preparation (ILSP) technique to remove phospholipids from protein precipitated plasma samples.

THURSDAY, JUNE 6
10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.; 1:30–2:30 p.m.
ThP 020 - Coated Blade Spray–High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry: A Versatile Tool for Sample Profiling and Screening of Controlled Substances in Complex Matrices
German Augusto Gómez-Ríos1, Robert Cody2, Nathaly Reyes-Garcés1, Frances Carroll1, Gary Stidsen1, David Bell1
1. Restek Corporation, 2. JEOL USA, Inc.
For more information, email German Augusto Gómez-Río.
Download a PDF of the full presentation.
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Coated blade spray (CBS) is a technology that allows for analyte collection and direct-to-MS interface from a single device. Essentially, CBS is a coated stainless steel sheet with the shape of a small sword that, thanks to its ultra-thin coating, permits rapid enrichment of small molecules present in complex samples and ionization via ESI mechanism. Herein, we demonstrate how CBS coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) enables rapid profiling of aqueous (e.g., beer) and solid (e.g., meat samples) matrices. Unlike other ambient-ionization technologies, CBS allows you to perform sampling remotely, cleaning up the sample and retaining relevant chemical information that facilitates its classification via chemometric tools. Furthermore, we explore CBS-HRMS as a tool for screening and quantitation of controlled substances in biological matrices such as urine.

10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.; 1:30–2:30 p.m.
ThP 344 - A Versatile Hybrid HILIC and Ion Exchange Column for the Separation of a Wide Range of Polar Compounds
Connor Flannery, Vernon C. Bartlett, Ahren Green, Terry S. Reid, Xiaoning Lu
Restek Corporation.
For more information, email Connor Flannery.
Download a PDF of the full presentation.
Read abstract

Hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) with mass spectrometry (MS) has increasingly become a powerful analytical tool because of its ability to retain and separate a wide variety of polar analytes. However, difficulties with method development and method robustness have brought challenges to the adoption of HILIC. In addition, the sufficient retention of highly polar ions, such as glyphosate and its metabolites, is still difficult to achieve with the current HILIC phases on the market.

We have developed a versatile hybrid HILIC/ion exchange column and have demonstrated its ability to not only retain and separate polar anions and cations, including glyphosate and its metabolites, organic acids, and water-soluble vitamins, amino acids and peptides, but also neutrals such as carbohydrates.

Visit the ASMS 2019 website.

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