How to Diagnose GC Septum Bleed Contamination Sources: Could it be Your Vial Cap?

Published By: Restek Corporation

Year of Publication: 2018

Link: http://www.restek.com/Technical-Resources/Technical-Library/General-Interest/general_GNAR2846-UNV

Abstract: In gas chromatography, septum bleed is often attributed to the inlet septum, but the vial cap septum can also be a source. Fortunately, it’s easy to determine which septum is causing the problem and by identifying it so you can avoid the time and trouble of unnecessary inlet maintenance. Read on to learn how to identify vial cap septum bleed and also how to choose a GC septum that will reduce the problem.

Upgrade to a Faster D2887 Analysis with a GC Accelerator Kit and Reduce Analysis Time to 9 Minutes in a 120 V GC

Author: Katarina Oden

Published By: Restek Corporation

Year of Publication: 2018

Link: http://www.restek.com/Technical-Resources/Technical-Library/Petroleum-Petrochemical/petro_PCAN2900-UNV

Abstract: The results of a simulated distillation analysis are vitally important to the operation of refineries globally. For the analysis of petroleum samples within the boiling point range from 55.5 ˚C to 538 ˚C, ASTM D2887 is a standard method that has been accepted and is used industry-wide. This application note will demonstrate how a creative use of the Restek GC Accelerator oven insert kit can permit analysts using Agilent 6890/7890 GCs with 100/120 V ovens to successfully migrate from D2887’s slower Procedure A conditions to the accelerated Procedure B conditions without new instrumentation or software, resulting in a 9-minute analysis time that meets all method requirements.

When Do We Need Sub-2-µm Superficially Porous Particles for Liquid Chromatography Separations?

Authors: David S. Bell, Landon Wiest, Shun-Hsin Liang, Dan Li

Restek Corporation

Published By: LCGC North America

Year of Publication: July 2018

Volume, Issue: Volume 36, Issue 7

Link: http://www.chromatographyonline.com/when-do-we-need-sub-2-m-superficially-porous-particles-liquid-chromatography-separations-0

Abstract: The use of superficially porous particles (SPPs) for modern high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is now very common. Initially, SPPs rose as an alternative to sub-2-µm fully porous particles (FPPs). In recent years, many column manufacturers have developed 2-µm and smaller SPP-based products. This article investigates the practical utility of these smaller SPP designs.

The Promise of Metal–Organic Frameworks for Use in Liquid Chromatography

Author: David S. Bell

Restek Corporation

Published By: LCGC North America

Year of Publication: June 2018

Volume, Issue: Volume 36, Issue 6

Link: http://www.chromatographyonline.com/promise-metal-organic-frameworks-use-liquid-chromatography

Abstract:  Metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) are self-assembled combinations of metals and inorganic ligands that result in a relatively young class of highly ordered, porous materials. Because of the number of structural and chemical possibilities, high surface area, controlled pore volume, and thermal properties, MOFs are being applied in a number of fields, including chromatography. Although there has been limited application of MOFs for liquid chromatography (LC), early studies have revealed great promise. In this installment of “Column Watch,” recent investigations toward the application of MOFs specifically for LC are presented and discussed.

Liquid Chromatography’s Complementary Role to Gas Chromatography in Cannabis Testing

Authors: Justin Steimling, Ty Kahler

Restek Corporation

Published By: Supplement to LCGC North America

Year of Publication:  June 2018

Volume, Number: Volume 36, Number s6

Link: http://files.pharmtech.com/alfresco_images/pharma/2018/06/13/f119cb54-ce43-4628-95f8-af1aa07bb6ff/LCGC_NAmerica_June2018Supp.pdf

Abstract: The absence of consensus methods for cannabis testing is a challenging, but refreshing opportunity for analytical chemists in the field because it enables the incorporation of the newest technologies and best practices without the restrictions imposed by legacy approaches that often impede method development in other industries. Liquid chromatography (LC) is proving to be a valuable complementary technique to gas chromatography (GC) in cannabis testing for the analysis of cannabinoids, mycotoxins, and pesticides. The industry is emerging during a time when superficially porous particles (SPPs) and ultrahigh-pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC) have become market standards. This article discusses the adoption of LC technology and its role in cannabis testing.

Beyond Particle Technology

Author: David S. Bell

Restek Corporation

Published By: Supplement to LCGC North America

Year of Publication: June 2018

Volume, Number: Volume 36, Number s6

Link: http://files.pharmtech.com/alfresco_images/pharma/2018/06/13/f119cb54-ce43-4628-95f8-af1aa07bb6ff/LCGC_NAmerica_June2018Supp.pdf

Abstract: Two of the more significant technologies, sub-2-μm particles and superficially porous particles (SPP), have taken a firm hold on modern liquid chromatography practice. Each of these developments were initially met with both excitement and their share of skepticism. Both emotions drove extensive research and ultimately adoption of the ideas. Today, both technologies are routinely used in many industries around the world, but where do we go from here? This supplement was assembled to provide examples of the ongoing research that is building upon recent particle technology developments.

Reference Module in Chemistry, Molecular Sciences and Chemical Engineering: QuEChERS

Authors: Alexandria M. Pavkovich, David S. Bell

Restek Corporation

Published By: ScienceDirect

Year of Publication:  June 2018

Link: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B9780124095472139721#!

Abstract: QuEChERS has become a widely accepted and highly adaptable method for pesticide residue analysis. The analytical scope and applicability of QuEChERS are expanding at a rapid pace. Numerous research groups work with QuEChERS for analysis of pesticides, veterinary drugs, mycotoxins, environmental and natural contaminants, drugs of abuse, and a number of other areas of interest.

The term QuEChERS is an acronym for Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged, and Safe. QuEChERS is a quick and relatively easy extraction method that uses low solvent volumes and a user-friendly collection vessel while providing acceptable and reproducible analyte recovery for a wide range of pesticides and target analytes. QuEChERS allows for the extraction of homogenized matrices by using salt formulations to drive the separation of the organic extraction solvent and water.