Robust Analysis of Fatty Acids in Milk: An Independent Lifetime Evaluation of Rt-2560 GC Columns

Published By: Restek Corporation

Year of Publication: 2019

Link: https://www.restek.com/Technical-Resources/Technical-Library/Foods-Flavors-Fragrances/fff_FFAR3047-UNV

Abstract:

The analysis of fatty acids in milk fat is an important test and this challenging matrix was used by Eurofins Analytik GmbH to evaluate the stability of Rt-2560 columns. Consistent retention times and separations were achieved even after 225 injections, demonstrating the column’s robust performance.

Restek to Present on Whole Air Sampling at AIHce 2019

Restek is pleased to be a sponsor at AIHce 2019! Our industry experts will be part of the instructor team during a day-long personal development course (PDC) on whole air sampling. If you attend PDC 113, you’ll learn why it’s an excellent alternative to traditional sampling methods, and how it provides more options to address sampling locations, conditions, and objectives. You can find details about this PDC and a link to the course description below. Register now at: https://www.aievolution.com/aih1901/index.cfm?do=ev.viewEv&ev=1602

If you are unable to attend the PDC, please stop by our booth to learn about Aura, a recently NIOSH-adopted technology for personal whole air sampling. We will gladly discuss how our collaborative research and development with Dr. Alan Rossner at Clarkson University resulted in a whole air sampling device that has now been written into NIOSH Method 3900!  We hope you can join us for this exciting conference on protecting workers’ health and to hear how our research and development have been contributing to this effort!

Stop by and visit us at booth# 1736!

Saturday, May 18 (8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.)
Minneapolis Convention Center (MCC)
Room: 101A
PDC 113: Whole Air Sampling Techniques, Application, and Execution
Steve Kozel (instructor), Jason Herrington (instructor)

Description: Participants will learn why whole air sampling is an excellent alternative to traditional sampling methods. Whole air sampling provides more options to address sampling locations, conditions, and objectives. This course will provide the techniques and information necessary to make the transition to whole air sampling and use it effectively. Topics to be discussed are advantages and disadvantages of each sampler type, selecting the proper technique, laboratory analysis of whole air samples, evaluating the QC data and laboratory results, and how regulatory agencies view and use whole air sampling data.

Tuesday, May 21 (11:30 –11:55 a.m.)
Learning Pavilion – Expo Hall
Aura — A New Way to Capture Whole Personal Air Samples 
Steve Kozel (presenter), Jason Herrington (presenter), Mike Chang, Shelby Kunzi
For more information, email Steve Kozel

Abstract: Restek has developed a whole air sampling device that has now been written into NIOSH Method 3900, which is designed to capture a whole air sample in the breathing zone of a subject without requiring bulky, heavy, noisy pumps. Just attach the Aura personal air sampler (PAS) to an evacuated air sampling canister and begin sampling for up to 8 hours while also being able to interrupt sampling by disconnecting the Aura PAS at any time.

About Aura
The Aura personal air sampler from Restek is setting a new standard in sampling technology. This innovative passive sampling device is designed to meet OSHA and NIOSH requirements, while overcoming the limitations of sorbent tubes and badges. Notably, this quiet, robust sampler does not require a pump and manages variations in face velocity, temperature, and humidity better than traditional sampling approaches. Since this is a whole air sampling technique, it allows multiple analyses of >100 VOCs, providing broader application utility than analyte-specific sorbent techniques. The Aura personal air sampler has a wider effective range than tubes and badges—it is sensitive down to pptv levels and there is no risk of breakthrough even at ppmv levels. Comfortable to wear and easy to operate, this novel sampler features a simple, quick connection that starts and stops flow with no flow calibration required.

Learn more at www.restek.com/Aura

Come see us at AIHce 2019  or contact your Restek representative  for more information about Aura

Differential metabolic signatures in naturally and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) fermented ting (a Southern African food) with different tannin content, as revealed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC–MS)-based metabolomics

Author(s): Oluwafemi Ayodeji Adebo1, Eugenie Kayitesi1, Fidele Tugizimana2,3, Patrick Berka Njobeh1

1. Department of Biotechnology and Food Technology, University of Johannesburg

2. Research Centre for Plant Metabolomics, Department of Biochemistry, University of Johannesburg

3. International R&D, Omnia Group, Ltd

Published By: Food Research International

Issue: Vol. 121, July 2019

Year of Publication: 2019

Link: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0963996919302017

Abstract: Fermented whole grain (WG) sorghum food products including WG-ting can be obtained from different sample sources and fermentation conditions, leading subsequently to variations in the molecular composition of the products. There is however, a lack of detailed understanding and description of differential molecular profiles of these food products. Thus, the current study is a nontargeted gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC–MS)-based metabolomics approach to descriptively elucidate metabolic profiles of two WG-sorghum types [high tannin (HT) and low tannin (LT)] and their derived WG-ting products obtained via fermentation. Metabolites were extracted with 80% aqueous methanol and analyzed on a gas chromatography high resolution time of flight mass spectrometry (GC-HRTOF-MS) system. Chemometric methods such as principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal partial least square-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) were applied to mine the generated data. Our results showed that tannin contents influenced the composition of the raw sorghum and derived WG-ting samples. Metabolite signatures that differentiated raw HT- and LT-sorghum included cyclic compounds, pesticides, 2,4-di-tert-butylphenol, fatty acid esters, and sugar derivatives. Furthermore, fermentation of the HT- and LT-sorghum into WG-ting led to an increase in the levels of fatty acids, fatty acid esters and some other compounds which are vital from a dietary and health context. Equally observed were reduction of some phenols, cyclic compounds, a pesticide and ketone. Thus, the results demonstrated that the inherent metabolic composition of raw sorghum would lead to differential metabolic changes in the fermented products such as WG-ting, with subsequent dietary and health implications. Fermenting ting with Lactobacillus fermentum FUA 3321 was most desirable as relevant metabolites were observed in both HT- and LT-ting samples. Furthermore, the study highlights the applicability of GC–MS metabolomics in understanding WG-ting fermentation.

Note(s): The study was done using the Rxi-5ms column.

Can Nonmatching Mycotoxin SIDA Internal Standards Be Used for Stable Isotope Dilution Assay Calibration?

Published By: Restek Corporation

Year of Publication: 2019

Link: https://www.restek.com/Technical-Resources/Technical-Library/Foods-Flavors-Fragrances/fff_FFAR3036-UNV

Abstract:

Stable isotope dilution assay (SIDA) is a calibration technique that can be used to offset matrix effects. However, care must be given to choosing appropriate internal standards. This article demonstrates the importance of using a labeled internal standard that matches the target analyte for mycotoxins analysis.

Faster GC-MS Analysis of 3-MCPD and Glycidyl Esters in Edible Oils

Published By: Restek Corporation

Year of Publication: 2019

Link: https://www.restek.com/Technical-Resources/Technical-Library/Foods-Flavors-Fragrances/fff_FFSS3027-UNV

Abstract:

The analysis of 3-MCPD and glycidyl esters using AOCS Cd 29c-13 is time consuming and exposes the GC-MS to harsh derivatization reagents that can limit column lifetime and increase maintenance costs. Here, we optimized the method using split injection, resulting in a time savings of 8 minutes, less damage from derivatization reagents, and the flexibility to use either PTV or split/splitless inlets.