Fast, Low-Solvent Analysis of Cannabinoids Increases Lab Productivity and Decreases Solvent Costs

Published By: Restek Corporation

Year of Publication: 2019

Link: https://www.restek.com/Technical-Resources/Technical-Library/Foods-Flavors-Fragrances/fff_FFSS3123-UNV

Abstract: Suitable for high-throughput cannabis testing labs, this LC-UV method reliably separates 19 cannabinoids in a quick, 10-minute analysis. Using only 3 mL of acetonitrile per run, labs can significantly decrease solvent use and the associated costs by adopting this procedure.

Attain a More-Comprehensive Characterization of Cannabis Samples with Restek’s New Cannabicyclol (CBL) Reference Standard

Cannabicyclol (CBL) is formed through the photodegradation of cannabichromene (CBC). Levels are typically quite low, and the medicinal benefits of CBL are still being researched, but quantifying this compound in cannabis samples is crucial for obtaining a more-complete cannabinoids profile. Restek has just released a new CBL certified reference material (CRM) to further aid labs in the comprehensive characterization of cannabis: www.restek.com/catalog/view/54615

Restek’s new CBL standard is ideal for creating multipoint (5-point minimum suggested) calibration curves for LC analysis. With verified composition and stability, this prepared stock product eliminates the need for in-house standards preparation for greater convenience and lower labor requirements. As a U.S. DEA-exempted formulation, no additional customer permits or licensing are required to purchase within the U.S., and because it’s manufactured and QC tested in Restek’s ISO-accredited labs, this new CBL standard qualifies as a certified reference material (CRM) that satisfies your ISO requirements.

For CBL and other reference standards, Raptor LC columns, sample preparation products, and the expert consultation your cannabis lab needs, turn to www.restek.com/cannabis

Leveraging Selectivity and Efficiency to Take the Strain Out of LC–UV Method Development for Cannabinoid Profiling

Author(s): Justin Steimling
Restek Corporation

Published By: Cannabis Science and Technology

Issue: Volume 1, Issue 4

Year of Publication: 2018

Link: http://www.cannabissciencetech.com/article/leveraging-selectivity-and-efficiency-take-strain-out-lc%E2%80%93uv-method-development-cannabinoid

Abstract: More than 100 cannabinoids have been isolated from cannabis in addition to the five most commonly tested: ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol (∆9-THC), ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA), cannabidiol (CBD), cannabidiolic acid (CBDA), and cannabinol (CBN). Although many methods have been published that show the separation of these major cannabinoids, most do not take into account the possibility of interference from minor cannabinoids. This interference is most problematic in concentrates where minor cannabinoids can be enriched to detectable levels. Additionally, some terpenes absorb ultraviolet (UV) light at the same wavelength as cannabinoids, which can result in an additional source of interference. In this study, the liquid chromatography (LC)–UV separation of 16 cannabinoids of interest was performed while the potential impact from minor cannabinoids and terpenes on reported potency values was monitored. The method was applied to commercially available CBD oils that have recently become suspect because of inaccurate label claims.

Accurate Detection of Residual Solvents in Cannabis Concentrates

Author: Chris English

Restek Corporation

Published By: Cannabis Industry Journal

Year of Publication: 2017

Link: https://www.cannabisindustryjournal.com/category/the-practical-chemist/

Abstract:

Edibles and vape pens are rapidly becoming a sizable portion of the cannabis industry as various methods of consumption popularize beyond just smoking dried flower. These products are produced using cannabis concentrates, which come in the form of oils, waxes, or shatter. Once the cannabinoids and terpenes are removed from the plant material using solvents, the solvent is evaporated leaving behind the product. Extraction solvents are difficult to remove in the low percent range, so the final product is tested to ensure leftover solvents are at safe levels. While carbon dioxide and butane are most commonly used, consumer concern over other more toxic residual solvents has led to regulation of acceptable limits.