Achieving a Near-Theoretical Maximum in Peak Capacity Gain for the Forensic Analysis of Ignitable Liquids Using GC×GC-TOFMS

Author (s): Katie D. Nizio 1, Jack W. Cochran 2, and Shari L. Forbes 1

  1. Centre for Forensic Science, University of Technology Sydney
  2. Restek Corporation

Published By: Separations

Issue: Volume 3, Issue 3

Year of Publication: 2016

Link: 10.3390/separations3030026

Abstract:

At present, gas chromatography–quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-qMS) is considered the gold standard amongst analytical techniques for fire debris analysis in forensic laboratories worldwide, specifically for the detection and classification of ignitable liquids. Due to the highly complex and unpredictable nature of fire debris, traditional one-dimensional GC-qMS often produces chromatograms that display an unresolved complex mixture containing only trace levels of the ignitable liquid among numerous background pyrolysis products that interfere with pattern recognition necessary to verify the presence and identification of the ignitable liquid. To combat these challenges, this study presents a method optimized to achieve a near-theoretical maximum in peak capacity gain using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) for the forensic analysis of petroleum-based ignitable liquids. An overall peak capacity gain of ~9.3 was achieved, which is only ~17% below the system’s theoretical maximum of ~11.2. In addition, through the preservation of efficient separation in the first dimension and optimal stationary phase selection in the second dimension, the presented method demonstrated improved resolution, enhanced sensitivity, increased peak detectability and structured chromatograms well-suited for the rapid classification of ignitable liquids. As a result, the method generated extremely detailed fingerprints of petroleum-based ignitable liquids including gasoline, kerosene, mineral spirits and diesel fuel. The resultant data was also shown to be amenable to chromatographic alignment and multivariate statistical analysis for future evaluation of chemometric models for the rapid, objective and automated classification of ignitable liquids in fire debris extracts.

 

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Evaluation of Conditions of Comprehensive Two-Dimensional Gas Chromatography That Yield a Near-Theoretical Maximum in Peak Capacity Gain

Author(s): Matthew S. Klee1, Jack Cochran2, Mark Merrick3, Leonid M. Blumberg4

  1. XO Associates LLC
  2. Restek Corporation
  3. LECO
  4. Advachrom

Published By: Journal of Chromatography A

Year of Publication: 2015

Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0021967315000771

Abstract:

The peak capacity gain (Gn) of a GCxGC system is the ratio of the system peak capacity to that of an optimized one-dimensional GC analysis lasting the same time and providing the same detection limit. A near-theoretical maximum in Gn has been experimentally demonstrated in GCxGC-TOF based on a 60 m x 0.25 mm primary column. It was found that Gn was close to 9 compared to the theoretical maximum of about 11 for this system. A six-sigma peak capacity of 4500 was obtained during an 80 min heating ramp from 50 °C to 320 °C. Using peak deconvolution, 2242 individual peaks were determined in a Las Vegas runoff water sample. This is the first definitive experimental demonstration known to us of an order-of-magnitude Gn. The key factors enabling this gain were: relatively sharp (about 20 ms at half height) reinjection pulses into the secondary column, relatively long (60 m) primary column, the same diameters in primary and secondary columns, relatively low retention factor at the end of the secondary analysis (k ≅ 5 instead of 15, optimal for ideal conditions), optimum flow rate in both columns, and helium (rather than hydrogen) used as the carrier gas. The latter, while making the analysis 65% longer than if using H2, was a better match to the reinjection bandwidth and cycle time.

 

 

Determination of Emerging Contaminants in Wastewater Utilizing Comprehensive Two-Dimensional Gas-Chromatography Coupled with Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

Author(s): Sarah Prebihalo1, Adrienne Brockman1, Jack Cochran1,2, Frank L. Dorman1,3

1. Pennsylvania State University, Forensic Science Program
2. Restek Corporation
3. Pennsylvania State University, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Published By: Journal of Chromatography A

Year of Publication: 2015

Link: www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0021967315014132

Abstract: An analytical method for identification of emerging contaminants of concern, such as pesticides and organohalogens has been developed and utilized for true discovery-based analysis. In order to achieve the level of sensitivity and selectivity necessary for detecting compounds in complex samples, comprehensive gas chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC-TOFMS) was utilized to analyze wastewater samples obtained from the Pennsylvania State University wastewater treatment facility (WWTF). Determination of emerging contaminants through a process of combining samples which represent “normal background” and comparing this to new samples was developed. Results show the presence of halogenated benzotriazoles in wastewater samples as well as soil samples from Pennsylvania State University agricultural fields. The trace levels of chlorinated benzotriazoles observed in the monitoring wells present on the property indicate likely environmental degradation of the chlorinated benzotriazoles. Preliminary investigation of environmental fate of the substituted benzotriazoles indicates their likely degradation into phenol; an Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) priority pollutant.

Eight Tips for Easy GC×GC

Author(s): Jack Cochran
Restek Corporation

Published By: The Analytical Scientist

Issue: #18 (0714)

Year of Publication: 2014

Link: https://theanalyticalscientist.com/issues/0714/eight-tips-for-easy-gcxgc/

Abstract: Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography is often presented as extremely complicated. It isn’t. Here is some simple advice to help attract more users to the benefits.

QuEChERS, GC Smoke Out Tobacco Pesticides

Author(s): Michelle Misselwitz, Jack Cochran, Julie Kowalski
Restek Corporation

Published By: Chromatography Techniques

Year of Publication: 2014

Link: http://www.chromatographytechniques.com/articles/2013/12/quechers-gc-smoke-out-tobacco-pesticides

Abstract: Pesticides are used heavily on tobacco in order to increase crop production value; however, limited regulation creates the potential for high levels of pesticide residues to remain on finished tobacco products. Analysis of pesticides on tobacco is extremely challenging due the natural complexity of this botanical matrix. The work detailed here used the QuEChERS (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged, and Safe) approach for extraction and GCxGC-TOFMS for analysis. In addition, the experimental design compared dispersive solid phase extraction (dSPE) and cartridge solid phase extraction (cSPE) cleanup approaches. The wide range of pesticides chosen for this study covered many of the 37 pesticides that have been approved by the U.S. EPA for use on tobacco. The combination of QuEChERS, GCxGC-TOFMS, and dispersive solid phase extraction cleanup allowed easy and accurate analysis and separation of target pesticide residues from the tobacco matrix.

Comprehensive Two-Dimensional Gas Chromatography With a Multi-Capillary Second Dimension: A New Column-Set Format for Simultaneous Optimum Linear Velocity Operation

Author(s): Daniela Peroni1, Andjoe A.S. Sampat1, Wil van Egmond2, Sjaak de Koning3, Jack Cochran4, Roy Lautamo4, Hans-Gerd Janssen1,5

1. University of Amsterdam, 2. NLISIS, 3. LECO Corporation, 4. Restek Corporation, 5. Advanced Measurement and Data Modelling, Unilever

Published By: Journal of Chromatography A

Issue: tbd

Year of Publication: 2013

Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0021967313011989

Abstract: Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GCxGC) suffers from the impossibility to operate both dimensions at their optimum carrier gas velocity at the same time due to the different inner diameters of the columns typically employed. The use of multiple parallel capillary columns in the second dimension (GC x multi-GC) is studied as a means to achieve simultaneous optimum-velocity operation. A programme written in Microsoft Excel® was developed to calculate the efficiency of the two dimensions in GC x multi-GC for different numbers of columns in the second dimension. With the aid of this programme the appropriate number of columns was selected. Columns with maximum repeatability were specifically manufactured to grand suitable performance, i.e. to avoid band broadening effects caused by inter-column variations. 1D-GC experiments were carried out on the columns separately and combined in parallel. The performance of the parallel column set was consistent with that of the individual columns, with over 9100 plates generated (approximately 10,000 plates/m). A GC x multi-GC set-up was successfully installed. Model experiments proved the possibility to operate both dimensions at their optimum linear velocity simultaneously. The suitability of the novel second dimension column format to perform multidimensional separations was also shown for a number of selected applications.

Applying Comprehensive Analysis to EPA Method 1613B Samples: Discover Those Compounds Usually Discounted in Environmental Samples

Author(s): Jayne de Vos1, Jack Cochran2, Eric J. Reiner3, Peter Gorst-Allman4
1. National Metrology Institute of South Africa, 2. Restek Corporation, 3. Ontario Ministry of the Environment, 4. LECO Africa

Published By: Current Trends in Mass Spectrometry

Issue: July 2013

Year of Publication: 2013

Link: www.spectroscopyonline.com/spectroscopy/article/articleDetail.jsp?id=817655

Abstract: Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) are ubiquitous environmental pollutants that are persistent and toxic. The historical quantitative analysis of these compounds has been achieved with high-resolution targeted analysis using magnetic sector instruments, with subsequent lower resolution analysis to identify other contaminants. Advances in technology have led to comprehensive time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometers that can quantify PCDDs or PCDFs while simultaneously acquiring data on other contaminants in the samples. Samples that had been analyzed using EPA Method 1613B conditions on a sector instrument were analyzed with a high performance TOF mass spectrometer and a low-resolution comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) TOF instrument. The quantitative results from the sector, the high-resolution TOF, and the GC×GC-TOF systems are compared in this article.

Investigating the coffee flavour in South African Pinotage wine using novel offline olfactometry and comprehensive gas chromatography with time of flight mass spectrometry

Author(s): Yvette Naudé, Egmont R. Rohwer
Department of Chemistry, University of Pretoria, Private Bag X20, Hatfield 0028, Pretoria, South Africa

Published By: Journal of Chromatography A

Issue: 1271

Year of Publication: 2013

Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0021967312017499

Abstract: Pinotage wine from several South African wine cellars has been produced with a novel coffee flavour. We have investigated this innovative coffee effect using in house developed solventless sampling and fractionating olfactometric techniques, which are unique in their ability to study synergistic aroma effects as opposed to traditional gas chromatography olfactometry (GC-O) which is designed to, ideally, evaluate single eluting compounds in a chromatographic sequence. Sections of the chromatogram, multiple or single peaks, were recaptured on multichannel open tubular silicone rubber (polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)) traps at the end of a GC column. The recaptured fractions were released in a controlled manner for offline olfactory evaluation, and for qualitative analysis using comprehensive gas chromatography coupled to time of flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC–TOFMS) for compound separation and identification, thus permitting correlation of odour with specific compounds. A combination of furfural and 2-furanmethanol was responsible for a roast coffee bean-like odour in coffee style Pinotage wines. This coffee perception is the result of a synergistic effect in which no individual compound was responsible for the characteristic aroma.

 Acknowledgment(s):We wish to thank Gerhard Overbeek for assisting in the extraction of wine and aroma evaluation, Phakama Botha for assistance in wine extraction, Dr Fanie van der Walt for the custom-built olfactometer, David Masemula for the assembly of multichannel PDMS traps, Dr Peter Gorst-Allman from LECO Africa (Pty) Ltd. for use of a LECO Pegasus 4D GC×GC–TOFMS, Philip Langenhoven from LECO Africa (Pty) Ltd. for sponsorship, Jack Cochran from Restek for kind donation of GC columns and consumables, SASOL and the National Research Foundation (NRF) for financial support.