Changing from Helium and Nitrogen While Maintaining Separation Efficiency and Analysis Time

Author(s): Jaap de Zeeuw and Jack Cochran
Restek Corporation

Published By: LCGC’s The Column

Year of Publication: 2015

Link: http://images2.advanstar.com/PixelMags/lctc/digitaledition/October26-2015-us.html#2

Abstract: Most scientists in the world of gas chromatography (GC) will advise you not to use nitrogen because it is considered a “dinosaur” gas and, instead, use helium, which offers shorter analysis time. But, wouldn’t it be very nice if we could make nitrogen work for applications where helium is not an option?

Separation Science Asia 2014 to Feature Restek Talks on Carrier Gas Choice and GC Injection Techniques

Jaap de Zeeuw

Jaap de Zeeuw

Separation Science Asia 2014 takes place in Biopolis, Singapore, on November 19 and 20. This year’s scientific program features a new format that will focus on comprehensive, tutorial-style presentations covering a combination of best practices, troubleshooting, and method development. Joining a select group of chromatography and mass spectrometry experts invited to speak, Restek’s International GC Specialist Jaap de Zeeuw will offer two presentations:

Considerations for Choosing a Different Carrier Gas in Gas Chromatography

Jaap de Zeeuw (presenter)
Restek Corporation

Abstract: Traditionally, the carrier gas used in GC is helium. There are, however, increased drivers to choose a different carrier gas. This can be nitrogen or hydrogen. Especially in the last few years, there has been a lot of discussion to use different carrier gases because of the delivery issues for helium.

For many applications, one can use nitrogen, but there is an impact on the chromatography. Hydrogen is also a good alternative, as it also allows much shorter run times. There are practical issues to consider in changing carrier gas. In this presentation, an overview of opportunities will be presented as well as the practical concerns that have to be dealt with. Changing carrier gas is one thing, but we do prefer the same separations (peak elution order). For this we need to understand the impact, so the right actions can be taken. That means that changing carrier gas must also followed by a change of analytical conditions, meaning not only the pressure and split/splitless settings, but also the oven temperature program.

Changing to nitrogen is possible, but it also has some serious implications that need to be considered.

GC Injection Techniques for Trace Analysis

Jaap de Zeeuw (presenter)
Restek Corporation

Abstract: In gas chromatography, 90% of the trouble we experience is related to the injection technique and the conditions used. If sample transfer is not optimized, the results will not be reliable. The goal is to understand the injection process and how to obtain a narrow injection band.

In this talk, the basics of the most popular injection techniques that are used in gas chromatography for trace analysis, like split, splitless, and large volume injection, will be discussed. Also, the selection of liners, retention gaps, and columns will be addressed so one can understand why and how they are used. All techniques will be explained using practical examples.

Restek is a proud sponsor of Separation Science Asia 2014, and our chromatography experts will be on hand to discuss our latest industry-leading GC and LC solutions. If you make the trip to Singapore, be sure to stop by the Restek booth to learn how we can solve your analytical challenges.

To view the schedule of Separation Science Asia 2014 talks and to register, visit http://www.sepscience.com/Information/Events/Conferences/Separation-Science-2014 today.

Hydrogen as Carrier Gas: Always Available, Cost Effective and Fast – A Personal Reflection

Author: Jaap de Zeeuw
Restek Corporation

Published By: Chromatography Today

Issue: November / December 2012

Year of Publication: 2012

Link: http://www.chromatographytoday.com/articles/hplc-uhplc-lc-ms/31/jaap_de_zeeuw/hydrogen_as_carrier_gas_always_available_cost_effective_and_fast_a_personal_reflection/1333/

Abstract: Hydrogen is on the agenda again. Since the supply of helium has become a challenge, many labs are now considering the use of hydrogen as the carrier gas of choice. Most chromatographers agree that hydrogen is the best choice,because of the advantages on analysis time and availability, but safety management issues are the primary concerns with many chromatographers. Hydrogen can be generated safely in the lab and if you make the calculations, you will find that commercial gas generators are cost effective and will pay for their purchase price in a relative short time, particularly since the price of helium is high and unlikely to come down in the future. The focus of this paper will be to investigate the practical impact of using hydrogen in the lab and what other aspects need to be considered.