Using Alternative Carrier Gases with Accelerated ASTM D2887 Simulated Distillation Analysis

Author(s): Katarina Oden, Barry Burger, and Amanda Rigdon
Restek Corporation

Published By: Restek Corporation

Year of Publication: 2016

Link: http://www.restek.com/Technical-Resources/Technical-Library/Petroleum-Petrochemical/petro_PCAR2320-UNV

Abstract: ASTM Method D2887 now allows for alternate carrier gases, so hydrogen or nitrogen can replace helium carrier gas for simulated distillation. Here, we show that with an MXT®-1HT SimDist column and Restek’s EZGC® online method translator existing methods using helium can be easily converted to either hydrogen or nitrogen carrier gas. Because retention times are preserved with proper method translation, there are minimal changes to peak identification tables which significantly simplifies method validation.

Alternative Carrier Gases for ASTM D7213 Simulated Distillation Analysis

Author(s): Katarina Oden, Barry Burger, and Amanda Rigdon
Restek Corporation

Published By: Restek Corporation

Year of Publication: 2015

Link: http://www.restek.com/Technical-Resources/Technical-Library/Petroleum-Petrochemical/petro_PCAR2269-UNV

Abstract: Carrier gas changes for SimDist methods, such as ASTM Method D7213, can be easily implemented in your daily process. Using MXT®-1HT SimDist columns and EZGC® method translation software, helium-based SimDist methods can be easily translated to alternative carrier gases while maintaining ASTM Method D7213 requirements.

Deactivation of Metal Surfaces: Applications in Gas Chromatography (GC) for the Past 15 Years

Author: Jaap de Zeeuw
Restek Corporation

Published By: American Laboratory

Year of Publication: 2012

Link: www.americanlaboratory.com/913-Technical-Articles/124285-Deactivation-of-Metal-Surfaces-Applications-in-Gas-Chromatography-GC-for-the-Past-15-Years/

Abstract: In 1987, Restek Corporation introduced a new way to deactivate metal columns, called Silcosteel®. The original surface was shielded in such a way that the traditional reactive metal surface no longer impacted the chromatography. Later, a secondary deactivation—Siltek®—was applied wherein the surface of the silicon layer was further passivated. This deactivation allowed not only columns to be deactivated, but also liners, tubing, cylinders, connectors, etc. Surfaces were especially inert toward sulfur. Volatile sulfur compounds like H2S, methyl mercaptan, and even mercury are known to disappear when they are analyzed at trace levels or when they are stored for some time. The Siltek® technology rectified this. In addition, deactivation also had a unique side effect that was not expected: it increased the stability of high-temperature columns like simulated distillation and biodiesel applications such that column lifetime typically increased by a factor of 4.

American Laboratory